Wedding rings are special and we want ours to be unique, right? It is this obsession over having a one-of-a-kind wedding ring that sparked the $50 million lawsuit that Brad Pitt slapped against Damiani International when the jeweler started selling replicas of the ring that Brad Pitt designed for Jennifer Aniston.

We never considered buying ready-made rings. Speedy was very particular about the design so we commissioned my mother’s jeweler (from Meycauayan, Bulacan) and the discussion over the design began. If you look at ready-made rings, or if you browse through jewelry catalogs, you will notice that the inner part of rings, especially those of wide bands, are hollow. We didn’t want that. We wanted the inner part — the part touching the skin — to be flat. Because the design would make the ring more than one-fourth inch wide, and the top was domed, you can imagine how heavy the finished weddings bands turned out. Solid solid gold.

It wasn’t until months later that I would start questioning the practicality of the design. The rings were so wide and fat that when I held the fingers of my left hand upright, there was always a gaping V between my pinky and ring finger, and between my ring finger and index finger. Not only that. During humid days, I would get blisters. Because the ring was flat inside — that’s over one-fourth inch of metal wrapped around my finger — my skin couldn’t breathe.

It was a heavy ring. So heavy that when Speedy and I fought one time and I threw the ring across the room at him (he dodged and I missed his head), the sound was like a bushing clanging against a series of solid objects. The sound was so startling that we both paused for a few seconds before we resumed arguing. I am not kidding. There are things I can never forget and that episode is one of them. Even Speedy, forgetful as he is most times, remembers that.

We called the ring a bushing after that. It looked like a bushing, actually, except that it was gold, etched and domed. The domed design made it a lot heavier.

It wasn’t long after that we started thinking of having new wedding rings. We had moved in with my mother by then and with the Meycauayan jeweler over at the house at least once every week, well, why not unless I wanted more blisters or unless I really wanted to smash something next time we had a fight and I threw the bushing across the room at my husband.

diamong wedding ring

The second set of rings were made after we bought three .33 carat diamonds. Each was just the right size for a ring similar to the one in the photo above (that’s an antique-cut diamond that you see and it’s part of my family heirloom — so, that’s not it). Just like the first set of rings, the second was eventually recycled into something else. But we had those rings for years.

Then, we had puzzle rings. We bought silver puzzle rings in Baguio then had them copied in gold exactly like the one in this photo (click). We still have them. I stopped wearing mine because I never learned how to put the puzzle together. Everytime the pieces fell off, I had to ask Speedy to put them together but he complained all the time because my ring is small (size 6) and he found it hard to work on it.

Trinity ring designed by Cartier

That’s my current wedding ring on the right. It’s called a Trinity ring designed by Cartier. I first saw the Trinity ring online and I went nuts over it. Speedy couldn’t get the tri-colored version in my size though so he got me the all-yellow gold version instead. So, if anyone asks me who designed our wedding rings, I really should say Cartier… It’s TRUE. But NOT exactly. Speedy bought my ring in Bangkok — a much cheaper replica of the Cartier original. I liked the design; I didn’t care about a Cartier certificate. Then, we had a jeweler from Pasig make a similar one for him.